Cultivated Management

The Cultivated Core

The Cultivated Core

Cultivated Management Triangle

This page is all about the Cultivate Core – and what it means to you as a manager

1. Focus on YOU

At the core of Cultivated Management is a belief that we must Cultivate ourselves as managers in many aspects of our lives.

Our management is never more or less than the person we are. So to become a better manager we must become a better person.

To talk about being a better manager means to talk about learning and cultivation.

cul·ti·vate

  • To improve and prepare
  • To grow or tend
  • To promote the growth of
  • To encourage or foster
  • To acquire,develop, or refine, as by education

I believe that to be a better person (and therefore a better manager) we need to cultivate some basic areas of our lives. These are the Foundations of Cultivated Management that much of my coaching, mentoring, consulting and writing is based around.

  1. Health and Longevity
  2. Education
  3. Relevance
  4. Money
  5. Cultural & Societal Impact
  6. Effectiveness

Check out this post for more on the Foundations.

 

2. Focus on THE SYSTEM

The second aspect of the Cultivated Core is to focus on the system. The system is the whole – made up of the parts – it’s your company, teams and streams of work.

The system governs the productivity, quality, output, input, stress, success and culture of your business. Most managers spend their time trying to manage people and get more from them. This can work short term, but your people (no matter how good) will only ever give you what the system allows them to give. You’ve probably seen this before – great people thrown in to a system where they cannot succeed without changes to that system.

The system is what managers should focus on – you should study it, observe it, work in it, understand it and improve it methodically with your teams.

What is the system?

It’s the release process, the work environment, the recruitment process, the information systems, the flow of knowledge and work, the management, the customer feedback, the processes that support work, other departments and more.

Your job as a manager is to improve it – remove the rubbish, nonsense and waste – and free people from the constraints that don’t support success.

Focus on YOUR PEOPLE

The third element is to focus on your people. If you hire good people you should mostly leave them alone. Set ambitous goals, give feedback, offer coaching and learning paths, help them discover and use their strengths, minimise their weaknesses, give them the clarity they need to succeed and recognise their efforts.

People are unpredictable and mostly irrational – hence a good manager must watch, observe, study and listen.